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UGANDA

Uganda is home to half of the World's population of Mountain gorillas housed in Bwindi Impenetrable National Park and the remaining half is shared between Uganda (Mgahinga National park); Rwanda and DRC.

In seven hours you can drive from mist-shrouded volcanic mountains to hot hazy savannah, dappled with wildlife with ten national parks in different parts of the country and with undulating hills and valleys of bananas, coffee and tea plantations, papyrus swamps and water bodies like Lake Victoria, Lake Kyoga ,Lake Albert, Lake George and The Source of River Nile for White water rafting(Grande five ) giving way to tangled jungles and rainforests with the musical accompaniment of chaotic, cacophonous birdlife.

Diversity and Biodiversity of Uganda
Biodiversity is simply defined as a wide variety of species of flora and fauna and ecosystems within a given habitat. Uganda is 0.18% of the world's mass, yet has 10.2% of the world's birds species, (Uganda has more birds per square kilometre as compared to any country in Africa) 6.8% of the world's butterfly species, and 7.5% of the world's mammals, to mention but a few.

Uganda has the highest density of primate species, (gorillas, chimpanzees, olive baboons, to mention but a few) compared to any other country on earth. Kibale Forest National Park and Bwindi have 16% of the polypore fungi recorded from North America and Europe.

Uganda is home to three of the UNESCO protected sites at Bwindi impenetrable forest, Rwenzori Mountains National Park and Kasubi tombs.

The Impenetrable Forest Reserve was gazetted in 1942, upgraded to the Bwind Impenetrable National Park in 1992 and recognised as a World Heritage Site in 1994. in the local Rukiga language, Bwindi actually means 'Impenetrable.' This double warning is apt, for Bwind is all but impenetrable; 327km2 of tangled vegetation draped over a deeply fissured landscape of steep, slippery valleys and high, draughty ridges. But if the terrain is far from easy to negotiate, it is well worth the effort. Atrek thruogh this, one of Africa's most ancient rainforests, in search of the endangered Mountain Gorillas, ranks among the world's premier wildlife encounters.
Bwindi can be cold especially in the morning and at night with the coldest period being June and July. Warm clothing is required plus wet weather gear since Bwindi recieves up to 2390mm of rain/year. This is concentrated during two wet seasons, short rains in March-May and heavy rains in September-November. Instead of short tropical deluges, rain in Bwindi often falls as long hours of soft drizzle.